I Am The Eggpod: Yellow Submarine

The Beatles - Yellow Submarine (Parlophone, 1969).

Yellow Submarine is the Beatles album nobody ever talks about – and yes it is a proper album – probably because only one side of it is actually by them, and the other is by George Martin. So what else could I have chosen to talk about when I was invited to appear on the best Beatles podcast there is, I Am The Eggpod?

Over the course of an enormously fun chat with host Chris Shaw I explain exactly how and why Yellow Submarine deserves more attention and respect than it currently seems to get – especially strange considering that the film itself is held in incredibly high regard now – as well as looking at its wider context of sixties pop music and soundtracks and George Martin’s wildly eccentric career, not to mention standing up for the widely-dismissed new Beatles numbers featured on the album. Well, three of them at least. You’ll also find out who I think did Hey Bulldog better than The Beatles, why I think The League Of Gentlemen might have listened to the George Martin side more than once, more of my theories on Carnival Of Light, and the very strange tale of how I first became interested in The Beatles in the first place. Plus there’s plenty on loads of mid-sixties music you may or may not have heard including AMM, Timon, The Eyes and George Martin’s launch music for Radio 1. Beatles To Battle!

You can find I Am The Eggpod: Yellow Submarine on most leading podcast services or listen to it below.

 

Buy A Book!

You can find a huge feature on legendary unreleased Beatles track Carnival Of Light in my book  Can’t Help Thinking About Me, a collection of columns and features with a personal twist. Can’t Help Thinking About Me is available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

Further Listening

Chris has been a guest on my podcast Looks Unfamiliar, where his choices included Bailey’s CometsThe Phantom Tollbooth and BBC2’s Rock Shool; you can find it here.

Further Reading

Meet The Mono Beatles! is a feature on Capitol Records’ eccentric approach to launching the Fab Four in America; you can find it here.

 

© Tim Worthington.
Please don’t copy this only with more italics and exclamation marks.

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